Hirsutism, Hypertrichosis, and Unwanted Hair: Treatment, Removal, and Reduction



Hirsutism, Hypertrichosis, and Unwanted Hair: Treatment, Removal, and Reduction


Jared Jagdeo

Divya Sharma

George Hruza



BACKGROUND

Hirsutism is terminal (coarse) hair growth in a woman that appears in a male distribution.1 It impacts approximately 10% of reproductive-age women in most populations, with the notable exception of Far East Asian women, who present less often. Evaluation and treatment is important as hirsutism is most often due to an underlying endocrine disorder, of which polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common, and it has a detrimental effect on patients’ aesthetic, psychological well-being and quality of life.2 Hirsutism is a consequence of androgen excess, and thus, other associated signs may include acne, androgenetic alopecia, infertility, and menstrual dysfunction. There are racial and ethnic differences in the degree of terminal hair growth, which is reflected in the prevalence of hirsutism in different populations.



PRESENTATION

The typical presentation of hirsutism is the presence of coarse dark hair on the upper lip, sideburns, cheeks, jawline, chin, and/or neck in a woman. Occasionally, other body sites are involved, including the arms, legs, and abdomen. Idiopathic hirsutism (IH) and the other benign forms of hirsutism typically present at puberty. In contrast, cases presenting in middle age or older may suggest an adrenal or ovarian tumor (see section “Subtypes”).


Jun 29, 2020 | Posted by in Dermatology | Comments Off on Hirsutism, Hypertrichosis, and Unwanted Hair: Treatment, Removal, and Reduction
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